Warren Red

Warren Red

Our dear friends Warren Red have a little write up on their work for the Manhattan Cocktail Classic in Chilled Magazine. Could look happy about it chaps.

Manhattan Cocktail Classic 2013

Manhattan Cocktail Classic 2013

The team starts really knuckling down to all thing Manhattan Cocktail Classic now.

3 Months and counting.

Highlights include the now infamous Gala, packed full of bars, bands, dj’s, and oysters

This is how it shaped up in 2011

Manhattan Cocktail Classic Gala 2011 from BAMBOO London on Vimeo.

Domaine Chandon Shoot

Domaine Chandon Shoot

BAMBOO spent the last few days before Christmas styling cocktails for Chandon.

They are through post now – so here’s a sneak at one of the images we didn’t go with (because Peter drank half of it before shooting it)

The ones we did? well you’ll have to watch the Press.

Power of Film Benefit

In November, BAMBOO had the pleasure of working with Chivas Regal and FilmAid at FilmAid’s annual Power of Film Benefit. Chivas Regal and FilmAid have forged an inspirational partnership, this video depicts some of the important work that this has made possible.

UPDATE – 71,500 views BEEFEATER 24 – Just for a moment

UPDATE – 71,500 views BEEFEATER 24 – Just for a moment

BAMBOO directed this little film for our good friends at BEEFEATER 24

DIY Moonshine

Rumor has it that David Haskell (an editor at New York) and Kentucky native Colin Spoelman, the owners and master distillers of Kings County Distillery are working on a book. Looking forward to reading their “guide to bourbon, moonshine, and rye, chronicling the history of whiskey in America, the rise of their Brooklyn distillery, and offering instructions for making moonshine at home.” In the meantime stop and take a tour of their distillery and “boozeum” open on Saturdays. Make sure to sip on the chocolate flavored whiskey distilled using the leftover Mast Brother’s chocolate husks.

The Bar10der

No Comment!

The Bar10der

Absolut Unique

Delighted to see another innovation from Absolut.

NG7 6SA

NG7 6SA

BAMBOO designed an aperitif for Sat Bain’s 2 week tenure in the Electrolux Cube over the Jubilee weekend. The Electrolux Cube is a pop up restaurant that is spending the summer on the roof of the Royal Festival Hall.

Sat has a dish called the NG7 6SA that reflects the season’s best ingredients harvested from around the grounds of the restaurant. Our drink was a wild infusion made from plants picked around Sat Bain’s restaurant on the banks of the River Trent topped with a little tonic and double charged with CO2. Designed to reflect a Nottingham meadow, hedgerow and woodland in late spring.

How did we get there?

Well, an aperitif is typically long, cold, drying, stimulating and relatively low in alcohol. It is designed to stimulate the appetite. Perhaps the most popular British aperitif is the G&T. What can be more appropriate this weekend than a gin and tonic? A G&T isn’t very British in origin though – the drink itself is a product of early 19th century India, as Company men dosed their medicinal ‘tonic’ with a little gin to make it go down easier. A national pastime was born! Aside from provenance, its ingredients are pretty worldly too. Gin is perhaps the most cosmopolitan of spirits, made with exotic ingredients from all over the world – infused, macerated, compounded or redistilled with neutral grain spirit. Its partner, Tonic, is flavoured with quinine, harvested from the cinchona tree, a native of South America, although today more often African. Still, it’s hardly Somerset.
Thirteen, our test kitchen, set to with an idea to create a wild British aperitif, thirst quenching, fresh and vibrant. Something to delight our gin lovers. Gins are complex layers of carefully compiled flavours made up by ‘botanicals’, which fall into a number of camps, that may or may not be used depending on the individual distiller; Juniper must, by definition, be the leading man, followed by roots – like orris, angelica and ginger. Seeds and pods – coriander, caraway, anise and cardamom. Dried and fresh citrus peel – lemon, orange, lime and grapefruit. Barks – cassia. Dried berries – cubeb and grains of paradise. Spices – cumin, nutmeg. Nuts – almonds. And last, but by no means least, Plants – saffron, fennel, liquorice, rosemary, rose, cucumber and tea.
For the sake of simplicity we very loosely grouped these into flavours into woody, citrus, herbaceous and spice and we chose a selection of wild plants from around SB’s restaurant – sampling them raw, steeped in hot water, oven dried and infused into a neutral spirit. You can get carried away here (just look at the Carthusians – Chartreuse has 130 herbal extracts) but as we nosed and tasted our way through japanese knotweed, wormwood, dandelion and sorrel a couple of stars emerged – lovage, sweet cicely and douglas fir. Infused into spirit, under vacuum at 35 degrees, these plants just sang. Lovage was celery, cardamom, coriander seed and a delicate touch of menthol. Sweet cicely was anise, liquorice and with a little cut grass freshness, almost a cucumber cleanness. Douglas fir was an incredible grapefruit explosion, delicate floral pine and dark resinous undertones.
For a consistent base we chose a soft and luscious potato vodka, Chase, of Herefordshire no less, because it not only provided us some body, but went a long way went a long way towards rounding out any rough edges these green infusions had. Tasted individually these were delicious, but the challenge was to blend them together in a cohesive way so that each component; spice, herb, citrus and wood complemented each other. The final blend also needed to stand up to our tonic (after a few trials with house tonics, we actually got a superb result with Fever Tree – you can meddle too much, after all) with its cane sugar, quinine, citric acid and CO2.
Many batches later we had a winner. We ended up adding extra water, a little extra sugar, some extra citric acid and double charging it with CO2 before bottling, crown capping and labelling.
Fresh, aromatic and lingering – it is wonderfully refreshing. Big grapefruit nose with layers of herbal notes stacked behind, flitting from anise, celery and floral pine into something darker and a bit spicier. In the mouth you get a big citrus attack and a firm mousse of crisp bubbles softening into herbaceous notes and sweet resinous spice. The aftertaste is citrus and celery, clean and moreish with a dry quinine finish.
NG7 is a truly unique aperitif, crafted in an unique kitchen. Based on the habits of the British Raj and reinvented from England’s green and pleasant land for a chef with those same exotic roots. Quite a journey.

The Shanty

Planning a visit to our good friend Allen Katz this weekend.